Whitewater paddling is a great platform for an exciting day‚Äźtrip adventure. Many 
companies around the world have capitalized on public interest in whitewater; these guide 
companies take people with varying levels of experience out on rivers. There are 13 
commercial raft companies in the Adirondacks with professional guides (Jenkins). These 
companies send customers down stretches of Adirondack rivers, such as the Moose, the 
Sacandaga, the Hudson, and the Black, in rafts that fit a maximum of ten people. [Include 
map from Adirondack Atlas of locations of guide companies.] The companies send trips out 
almost every day in every season except winter, so the guides memorize the rapids and 
intricacies of the river. Even so, most companies require participants to sign a waiver about 
liability because of the danger that whitewater paddling entails.


        Waterways are public land in the Adirondacks, but the riverbanks are sometimes 
private, so rafting companies have to plan out their riverbank stops on public land, or sites 
that they own. The town of Indian Lake has capitalized on this venture and sold its land 
along the Hudson to raft companies (Connelly).

        Since rafts are larger than canoes and kayaks, and they are filled with air, they are 
more fun on rapids with more water. Since kayaks and canoes are closer the surface of the 
water and have little to no inflation, they can be exhilarating on lower class rapids. Rafting 
companies time their trips with dam releases to maximize their participants’ excitement. 
The large volume of water that is released by a dam over a short period of time is called a 
“bubble”. The federal law called the Electric Consumer Protection Act requires dam 
companies to have regularly scheduled whitewater releases in addition to other 
requirements that protect the environment (Lessels). Rafting companies pay the town of 
Indian Lake, which runs a dam, to releases a bubble on the companies’ schedule. With these 
scheduled releases of a “bubble”, the paddling season last much longer than it used to when 
paddlers had to depend on spring runoff. 


        When a company’s product is an dangerous as whitewater rafing, there are bound to 
be some lawsuits. In the Adirondacks, the Hudson River Raft Company, owned by Patrick 
Cunningham, has been guiding trips down Adirondack rivers since 1978 
(hudsonriverrafting.com). In February 2013, the company faced charges concerning a trip 
in September 2012 where an allegedly drunken guide took customers down Hudson River Gorge and 
one of the customers, Tammy Blake, drowned on the trip. When this accident report came 
out, other raft companies were concerned that it would scare customers away from the 
sport of whitewater rafting in general. Whitewater rafting companies are a business and 
therefore need to balance the enjoyment of their customers with safety. Tammy had signed 
a waiver, as many rafting companies require, however the company was liable because of 
the incapacitation of the guide (Connelly). Responsible rafting companies follow the safety 
guidelines of organizations like AW, but not all rafting companies take the risk of 
whitewater seriously. 


Jenkins, Jerry, and Andy Keal. The Adirondack Atlas. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse UP, 2004. Print.
Connelly, Joe. "Death on the River." Blog post. Adirondack Life Blog Archive Death on the 
River » Adirondack Life. Adirondack Life Magazine, June 2013. Web. 24 Feb. 2015.
Lessels, Bruce. Classic Northeastern Whitewater Guide. Boston, MA: Appalachian Mountain 
Club, 1998. Print.
"Home. " Hudson River Rafting Company ­ Rafting and Tubing Adventures on the Hudson, 
Sacandaga, Moose Rivers and Black River Canyon. Web. 24 Feb. 2015.